RSS

Tag Archives: demigod

Vincent Vance and the Rusted Factory

Vinnie yawned as he rolled over in his sleeping bag.  The light from the window was a square of brightness directly on his face.  He tried to roll the other way, and it didn’t leave.  Further, he rolled, and gravity took hold.  He landed with a thud and squawk, and finally sat up.

He began to run a thin hand through messy blond hair, but stopped midway and blinked before he withdrew his head.  Bleary eyes looked around, barely seeing as he struggled out of bedding he didn’t remember climbing into.

The boy dressed quickly in his usual grungy, oversized clothes, then pulled on his labcoat and goggles.  He grabbed his cell and stared at the painfully bright screen a few minutes.  Saturday.  Butthole of the morning.  He looked at the window and narrowed his eyes at the offending morning light, offended that it filtered right between the iron bars of the old factory office.  With practiced ease, he balled up his sleeping bag and tossed it onto the desk, then walked out of the room. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 6, 2014 in Futuristic Fiction

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The Starry Man

We met in a bar.  My friends dragged me to the dark building, lit with rustic light bulbs instead of diffused-beam lighting system.  When I asked the bar worker, he said the owner had a stockpile from back when bulbs were viable, and he hated to waste money.

The light from the bulbs was fuzzy, and as my friends dragged me from the bar to a table, I spotted her. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 9, 2013 in Futuristic Fiction

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Vincent Vance (Part II)

Continued from Vincent Vance.

It was two years after the worst year of his life, and the only time he was happy was during the government-required summer camp that lasted all of one month out of twelve.  He had friends there, and he felt that at camp, people approved of him.  He was often quiet and stayed to himself, but one older girl had broken through part of his barriers, and he often refused to leave her side.

He even left his own mother in the dust to be with the girl called Mellie, and at camp, he insisted that his name was not Vincent, but Vinnie– to match his best friend. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Vincent Vance

Everywhere he looked, Vincent saw that normal humans like his father were rare.  Almost everyone was like his mother– a race called demis.  The demis were a race of semi-divinities with lengthened life spans, an element they could get killed by to give them a third form, and a realm, which gave them a second form and that controlled their lives.

Many of the realms were considered “common”, like grief, happiness, love– the emotional spectrum, and a few others, like children and sex.  Some concretes, elements, and ideas as realms were much more rare.  Magic, mad science, fire– just a few of the realms that were under government protection for the sake of keeping the world from losing its so-precious balance. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,