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Monthly Archives: February 2013

Elmer the Alchemist

Enric grunted as he lifted the massive basket of herbs.  The heavy load made his back ache, and he had to struggle to keep it upright. “Master Elmer!  Hold the door please!” he begged as he approached.  From the doorway, Enric’s youthful looking, long haired master looked up.  He smiled and held the door open.  His wide sleeves hung from his slender arms, and made the man look almost frail.

“I told you to only fill it halfway, Enric.” he scolded gently.

“I didn’t want to make more trips than one.  You’re going to teach me that pain-killing potion today, aren’t you?  I  want to start learning it fast!” Enric grinned broadly. “I might even need to use it!” He laughed. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 28, 2013 in Semihistorical Fiction

 

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Guin Weds

Continued from BoGo.

The time for High Lord Guin’s new marriage approached rapidly.  His new betrothed was a stranger from another country, and said to be from a very numerous and fertile family.  He asked often after her.  Was she kind?  Would she treat his daughter well?  Each question he asked during his visit to the capital reached her ears, and she was pleased that he placed his ill daughter before his own happiness.  Never once did the man ask after her appearance, or try to learn of any deformities.

The woman was impressed, and she told Guin’s king that she was pleased with the man before the two ever set eyes on each other.  Nonetheless, they still had to do the formal dancing through hoops.  There was paperwork and meetings.  They had to arrange their wedding ceremony.

Guin had to prepare Boreal to sit very still in an uncomfortable seat without betraying to the assembled that she was not of sound mind.  He sighed as he sent yet another letter to his betrothed. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2013 in Futuristic Fiction

 

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BoGo

The High Lord Guin stared out his tower at the grand city below. His gaze was smoldering, and he gripped a sheet of paper so tightly it crinkled in his grip. “It can’t be true.” He growled as his orange eyes settled on the physician who brought the news and narrowed. “What is the treatment, and what is its cost?”

As the doctor explained, Guin raised a hand. “About the delusions you mentioned, how bad are they?” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 26, 2013 in Futuristic Fiction

 

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Death Learning

If any could ever find fault in me as I fulfilled my merciful duties, that fault was my love.  I loved every single living person, just as much as I loved those who had already died.  King, peasant, whore, saint, I loved them all.

My only sadness was how none loved me, in return.  It was heartbreaking.  Every time I approached, the people I loved so dearly fled as though I was a monster, come to bring them agony and pain.  No, that was my mother’s duty, and they adored her, but I was not bitter.

Mother’s duties were unpleasant enough as it was, and in her twisted mind, she thought herself a scion of goodness and love to those beneath us.  She did not need me to think cruelly of her, even when she brought suffering upon the hearts of innocent children.  Besides that, it was simply not my place. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2013 in Semihistorical Fiction

 

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The Spirits Provide

Pole goes in the water.  Pole jabs the bottom.  Push the pole away and pull it out at the same time.  Go forward.  Turning is harder, but goes the same way.  That’s what Pop always told me before he died on a ferrying run gone bad.  He was gone now, so the ferry was mine.

It was a shitty raft, moved by a long pole.  It took a lot of raw strength and quick thinking.  Pop had been saving up for a real boat, but he lost his money when he went underwater.  All I had was what the Spirits let return: his raft, his pole, and his teachings. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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Morella Brightcloud

Her story starts before her birth.  Morella’s mother and her father, Achille, were deeply in love, despite her father’s strange fascination and obsession with order.  Rumors circulated, however, that Morella’s mother slept with people in order to gain their favor in her husband’s endeavors, but Achille ignored the rumors and simply enjoyed the woman’s company.  Morella was born, and any who looked at her saw mother and father– there was no doubt that she was not a bastard– especially after she began to sort her toys by size and color.  Many times, Morella did catch her mother with other men, and her mother explained very patiently that there was nothing wrong with embracing a sexual nature, but she must save her virginity for the person she was destined to marry, and that she must not tell her father of such things.

When Morella asked her mother if the woman still loved Achille, she answered “With all my heart, which is why I sometimes embrace people I do not like at all– for his sake.  If they see me come to them, they assume both of us must like them, or that they have some advantage, and your father can simply clean up the mess, which he is very good at.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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The Ass Returns

Continued from Oh Shit.

Edaline returned to her father’s house as an unwed woman.  Her maidenhead broken, she had little hopes of a new marriage, and her father treated her coolly, while her mother coddled her.  There she waited for the man she didn’t expect to come.  The days became weeks, and she began to lose hope.  Should she return to her husband?  For a few days, she debated it, and even began to pack.  If he didn’t accept her return, she would be without hope for a future that lacked shame.

She stopped packing.  She needed answers too badly.  She would remain, and she would wait. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2013 in Semihistorical Fiction

 

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